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MID-WINTER CHECK UP

winter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s lots of great ways to enjoy the winter. Sledding, ice skating, and the chance to wear big puffy coats and heavy boots. Of course, there’s also winter weather to consider and so far, we’ve seen it all: cold, wind, snow, and some sunny days too. Now that we’re about halfway through such an unpredictable winter, we thought it might be a good time to give you 5 things to think about when it comes to keeping your family safe.

Car Seats and Winter Coats. We know you want your little ones to be warm, but please don’t buckle your child into a car seat while wearing a bulky coat. The coat can compress in a crash and create a loose car seat harness, putting your child at greater risk of injury in the event of a crash. Instead, lay the jacket over your children like a blanket once they’re safely secured.

Sleep Safety. Extra blankets can seem so cozy in a baby’s crib but soft bedding can block a baby’s airway during sleep. A firm mattress covered with a tight-fitting crib sheet is all you need for your baby to sleep well. If you’re worried about keeping your baby warm on those cold winter nights, try using a sleepsack (wearable blanket). They’re pretty cozy, too.

Winter Sports. Kids love to push the limits when they’re skiing or snowboarding. Make sure they wear helmets and other proper gear to keep them safe if they fall on the slopes. Kids also might not be inclined to drink as much water when they’re playing in cold weather because they don’t get as hot. Remind them to stay properly hydrated.

Carbon Monoxide. This is a great time to make sure your home has a carbon monoxide alarm on every level, especially near sleeping areas, and keep them at least 15 feet away from fuel-burning appliances. If you’re warming up a vehicle, don’t forget to remove it from the garage immediately after starting it. It’s extremely dangerous to leave a car, SUV or motorcycle engine running inside a garage.

Fire Safety. Create and practice a home fire escape plan with two ways out of your house in case of a fire. This can be a fun activity for the whole family. Here’s a handy worksheet to help get you started. And remember to keep space heaters at least three feet away from anything that can burn. More tips on fire.

For more child safety tips go to:  www.safekids.org.  Have a fun and safe winter.

Winter Sports Safety

With snow comes outdoor activities like sled riding, skiing, snowboarding and ice skating. Thousands of children suffer injuries during these activities that may be prevented.

Helmets are essential for many outdoor winter activities. The risk of head injury is too great to leave the helmet in a closet at home. Helmets prevent or reduce the effects of 53 percent of the head injuries suffered by children while skiing or snowboarding.

Children should bundle up and enjoy the outdoors. Before heading out, it is important to remember a few key items in addition to the hat and gloves.

Safety Tip

Top Winter Safety Tips

  • Always wear sport-specific, properly fitting safety gear when participating in winter sports.
  • Kids should always wear helmets when they ski, sled, snowboard and play ice hockey. There are different helmets for different activities.
  • Parents should wear helmets too. Remember, your children learn safety habits by watching you.
  • Dress in layers and wear warm, close-fitting clothes. Make sure that long scarves are tucked in so they don’t get entangled in lifts, ski poles or other equipment.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink fluids before, during and after winter play.
  • Kids — or caregivers — who become distracted or irritable, or begin to hyperventilate, may be suffering from hypothermia or altitude sickness, or they may be too tired to participate safely in winter sports. They need to go indoors to warm up and rest.
  • Children under 6 should not ride a snowmobile, and nobody under 16 should drive one. All snowmobile drivers and passengers should wear helmets designed for high-speed motor sports. A bike helmet isn’t sufficient for a four-wheeled motorcycle that can go up to 90 miles per hour.