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    Safe Kids Middlesex County Walk To School Day in New Brunswick

    Safe Kids Middlesex County Walk To School Day in New Brunswick

    Safe Kids Middlesex County Walk To School Day in New Brunswick

    Safe Kids Middlesex County Walk To School Day in Dunellen

    Safe Kids Middlesex County Walk To School Day in Dunellen

    Safe Kids Middlesex County Walk To School Day in Dunellen

    Safe Kids Middlesex County Walk To School Day in Dunellen

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Safe Kids Walk This Way in Dunellen

WTW DUNELLEN 2013 005 (2)

John P. Faber Elementary School walked in the 10th Annual International Walk Your Child to School Day.  More than 300 parents, students, Fed Ex volunteers and school staff participated, enjoying the beautiful day, getting some exercise and having fun while learning what it takes to be safe pedestrians!

WTW DUNELLEN 2013 015

Faber School’s Walk Your Child to School day event was aided by the Dunellen Police Department, who provided safe escort through town to the school. Superintendent Pio Pennisi and Mayor Robert Seader walked with the students, as they do every year, to show their support of this special event.

Halloween Doesn’t Have to be a Dangerous Night for Children

On a potentially dangerous night of the year for child pedestrians, Safe Kids New Jersey urges parents to prepare children to act safely and drivers to take extra precautions.  On average, twice as many kids are killed while walking on Halloween compared to other days of the year.

Kids need proper safety instruction before they go out trick-or-treating.  Many kids will be out trick-or-treating while it is dark and thus more difficult for drivers to see them.  There are several simple and effective behaviors that parents can share with kids to help reduce their risk or injury.  For example, children younger than age 12 should not be alone crossing streets on this night without an adult.  If older kids are mature enough to go trick-or-treating without adult supervision, parents should make sure they go in a group and stick to a predetermined route with good lighting.

Drivers need to be extra alert as there will be more children on the streets and sidewalks – and may also be focused on gathering candy and the excitement of the holiday.  Drivers – be sure to slow down on neighborhood roads to make Halloween more enjoyable for everyone, but also to help save lives.

 

Top safety tips Safe Kids USA recommends for parents:

  • Cross the street safely at corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks. Look left, right and left again when crossing and keep looking as you cross.  Walk, don’t run, across the street.
  • Walk on sidewalks or paths. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible. Children should walk on direct routes with the fewest street crossings.
  • Slow down and stay alert – watch out for cars that are turning or backing up and never dart out into the street or cross in between parked cars.
  • Costumes can be both creative and safe. Decorate costumes and bags with reflective tape or stickers and, if possible, choose light colors. Masks can obstruct a child’s vision, so choose non-toxic face paint and make-up whenever possible instead. Have kids carry glow sticks or flashlights in order to see better, as well as be seen by drivers.  While glow sticks are good for visibility, remember that the liquid in glow sticks is also hazardous, so parents should remind children not to chew on or break them.
  • Slow down in residential neighborhoods and school zones. Remember that popular trick-or-treating hours are 5:30 to 9:30 p.m.
  • Be especially alert and take extra time to look for kids at intersections, on medians and on curbs. Children are excited on Halloween and may move in unpredictable ways.
  • Slowly and carefully enter and exit driveways and alleys.
  • Reduce any distractions inside your car, such as talking on the phone or eating, so you can concentrate on the road and your surroundings.
  • Check Candy – While kids never want to wait to dive into their candy, it is best to check sweets for signs of tampering before children are allowed to eat them

For more tips on how to keep kids safe while walking on Halloween and throughout the year, visit http://www.usa.safekids.org/  



New Seat Belt and Crosswalk Laws in New Jersey

New Jersey’s seat belt law has been tightened, something safety advocates have long pushed for. Signed on January 18, 2010 and effective immediately, legislation now requires ALL occupants in passenger vehicles including vans, pickup trucks and SUV’s that are required to be equipped with seat belts to buckle up, regardless of their seating position in a vehicle. A secondary offense, the new law allows police to issue summonses to unbuckled back seat occupants, 18 years of age and older, when the vehicle they are riding in is stopped for another violation.

Crash data show that unbelted rear-seat passengers can become high-speed ‘bullets’ during a crash, impacting other passengers with enough force to kill or seriously injure them. Studies show that the use of safety belts by back seat passengers can reduce the chance of death and serious injury up to 75 percent.

In addition, our current pedestrian law has been changed. Drivers are now required to come to a full stop and remain stopped for pedestrians while in a crosswalk or controlled intersection.  Previously, drivers were required to yield to pedestrians. Violators must pay a fine of $200.00 which will be imposed by the courts.

Safe Kids Walk This Way!

Safe Kids Bergen County Walk This Way

Safe Kids Bergen County Walk This Way

Child pedestrian injury remains the number two cause of unintentional injury death among children ages 5 to 14 in the U.S. Safe Kids New Jersey Coalitions were joined by FedEx volunteers and local school children to raise awareness of pedestrian safety on International Walk to School Day, October 7th.

 

This year marks the 10-year anniversary of the Safe Kids Walk This Way pedestrian safety program and the partnership with program sponsor FedEx. Through the year-long program, children learn safe pedestrian behaviors and together with Safe Kids, school communities identify local pedestrian hazards and educate pedestrians and drivers about safe behaviors and improve environments for child pedestrians.

Safe Kids Essex County Walk This Way

Safe Kids Essex County Walk This Way

 

Safe Kids Middlesex County Walk This Way

Safe Kids Middlesex County Walk This Way

Learn more about the Safe Kids Walk This Way program.

How to Protect Kids on the Most Dangerous Night of the Year

halloweenCard2TumbWith Halloween being one of the most dangerous days of the year for child pedestrians –children are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car and killed on Halloween than the rest of the year – it’s essential for parents to prepare their children properly to stay safe while trick or treating. 

With the days getting shorter, children are likely to be trick or treating in the dark when it is harder for drivers to see them and the excitement of the holiday can make everyone less cautious. To keep kids safe, parents should remind them about walking safely and ensure that they will be seen by drivers this Halloween.  

Parents need to remind kids about safety while walking before they go out trick-or-treating. Children should also bring flashlights or glow sticks with them, carry reflective bags or have reflective tape on their costumes and not wear masks which may inhibit their ability to see hazards. Ensuring kids are seen this Halloween is essential to keep this holiday fun for everyone. 

Halloween is supposed to be a spooky night, but parents don’t have to be scared about their kids’ safety if they follow some simple safety tips from Safe Kids New Jersey. 

Tips for Parents: 

Safe Kids recommends that children under age 10 do not trick-or-treat without adult supervision. If kids are mature enough to go trick-or-treating without supervision, make sure they stick to a predetermined route with good lighting. Parents must also remind kids to: 

  • Cross streets safely. Cross at a corner, using traffic signals and crosswalks. Try to make eye contact with drivers before crossing in front of them. Look left, right and left again when crossing, and keep looking as you cross. Walk, don’t run, across the street.
  • Walk on well-lit sidewalks or paths. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible.  Children should walk in familiar areas with minimal street crossings.
  • Be a safe pedestrian around cars. Watch for cars that are turning or backing up. Never dart out into the street or cross between parked cars.

Tips for Drivers: 

Drivers need to do their part to keep trick-or-treaters safe from harm. Safe Kids also reminds motorists to be extra careful this Halloween and recommends that drivers:

  • Be especially alert. Remember that popular trick-or-treating hours are during the typical rush-hour period, between 5:30-9:30 p.m.
  • Drive more slowly. Slow down and anticipate heavier than usual pedestrian traffic.
  • Lights on. Be sure to drive with your full headlights on so you can spot children from greater distances.

Although pedestrian safety is a main concern on Halloween, parents also need to keep in mind that there are other hazards for their children on this holiday. Parents must check treats for signs of tampering before children are allowed to eat them. Finally, Safe Kids New Jersey suggests that parents look for non-flammable costumes and non-toxic designations when choosing Halloween makeup.

For more tips on how to keep kids safe while walking on Halloween and throughout the year, visit http://www.usa.safekids.org/

One in Six Drivers in a School Zone Acts Like a Drunk Driver

The public expects drivers to be on their best behavior when they are near schools, but a new study shows the opposite is true when it comes to distracted driving. 

Distracted%20Drivers%20Web2As kids head back to school, new research from Safe Kids USA shows that one out of every six drivers in school zones is distracted by the use of cell phones, eating, drinking, smoking, reaching behind, grooming and reading.

 

The study Characteristics of Distracted Drivers in School Zones: A National Report also found that unbelted drivers are 34 percent more likely to be distracted than belted drivers, afternoon drivers are 22 percent more likely to be distracted than morning drivers, and females are 21 percent more likely to be distracted than males. 

The study consisted of more than 40,000 observational road-side surveys conducted by local Safe Kids researchers in 20 locations across the United States. Use of electronics (such as cell phones, PDAs and Smartphones) was the leading category of distraction while driving at 9.8 percent. This is a 2.5 percent increase over a 2008 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration survey that showed a rate of 7.3 percent. 

With recent research demonstrating that the driving skills of a distracted driver are as bad as or worse than an intoxicated driver, the overall relevance of this study is clear. Almost one in six drivers in a school zone behaves like a drunk driver.  Multitasking while driving can have deadly consequences.  Drivers need to shut off their phones and pay attention to the road, especially in areas that are filled with children.

The national finding that afternoon drivers are 22 percent more likely to be distracted is significant because throughout the year one in three child pedestrian deaths occur between 3 and 7 p.m., making afternoons the most dangerous time for children to walk. Drivers who were not wearing a seat belt were the most likely group in the study to also be driving distracted, meaning drivers engaging in one risky behavior are more likely to engage in multiple unsafe driving behaviors.

For more information about the new report on distracted drivers, tips for drivers and pedestrians or background on the Walk This Way program, call 202-662-0600 or visit www.usa.safekids.org/wtw/.